Digital Marketing

Targeting the Digital Latino: FTC Needs to Address how Digital Marketers are Tracking Hispanic Consumers, inc. Youth

Hispanics embrace of digital technologies, such as mobile phones, and their growing economic clout is attracting intense interest from marketers.  This report highlights some of the recent recent research and activities aimed at the U.S. Hispanic market.
 
We will be updating this report, including adding links which provide more information on the marketplace (and which raise privacy and consumer protection issues).
6/2/2013 Update:  http://www.pulpomedia.com/the-ihispanic-opportunity.html; http://www.pulpomedia.com/iHispanic-media.html

Facebook merges its Big Data on its Users with Big Data Brokers--and buys ad tracker Atlas

As part of the comprehensive system of commercial surveillance tracking us 24/7 wherever we go and do, more companies are integrating offline and purchasing data with online information.  But when the largest commercial database of individuals around the world marries its user data with the ton of consumer records held by Acxiom, Epsilon, Bluekai and

Digital Target Marketing to African Americans, Hispanics and Asian Americans: A New Report

Digital marketing, including data collection, profiling, tracking and targeting, pervades the Internet experience.  One of the less-discussed areas is the targeting of individuals because of their race or ethnicity.   As CDD's new report discusses, multicultural groups are "In the Digital Bullseye," with online advertisers and others focused on reaching African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans and others.  Data collected on each of us can include our financial status, health concerns, location, spending habits--and also ethnicity and race.  Multic

FTC Action on Data Brokers. It's time to uncover stealth surveillance practices tracking, analyzing, scoring and targeting consumers

The dramatic growth of the data broker industry, fueled by  information on consumers culled from the Internet, social media, mobile phones, and in-store shopping,  has created a multitude of all seeing eyes spying on Americans everyday.  A digital gold mine of infinite details is harvested about each of us--what we buy, who are friends are, how much we earn, our ethnicity, health concerns, location, etc.   For the most part, these records are off limits to consumers, who can't really discover what they say about us--including the likely errors they may contain.

Online Ad Lobby to Consumers: You Can't See or Control Your Information!

Who owns and controls your information?  You the individual---or the data brokers that now can collect everything you do online and off.  The public got its answer yesterday.  The lobbying group representing Google, Facebook, Yahoo and the unaccountable digital data mining industry say they get to decide whether a consumer can access and control their own information.  These folks have a future working with Mr. Putin at the Kremlin!
 

Microsoft Expands Data Targeting Across Platform, inc. use of offline data

Microsoft likes to suggest its concerned about consumer privacy.  Yet because they are in the digital marketing business worldwide, they are engaged in the full range of data collection and targeting practices which are problematic to both privacy and consumer protection.  Note how they are tapping into powerful offline databases, using Windows ID log-in information, and targeting cross-platform.  Microsoft will need to do a much better job on privacy.

Google User Tracking and Ad Targeting: "a single creative concept [will] create millions of permutations based on the user"

The integration of data on users and their networks along with advances in digital ad creation now permits many more variations of a interactive ad that's based on the unique behaviors of an individual.  It's one of the key issues involved wth the fight to protect online privacy.   Here's an excerpt from today's on Google's Neal Mohan (from Campaign Asia):

US/EU Groups Say No to Privacy Icon Self-Reg Scheme

Today, the leading consumer and privacy groups from both the U.S.

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